Today’s screens impose many restrictions on web typography. Web designers, developers, and publishers continue to rely on web-safe defaults like Arial or Georgia for small text, because before this series, there weren’t many other options that didn’t compromise readability. Font Bureau sought to alleviate this tension between the screen and legible, refined typography by proving to users that the RE typefaces would help them celebrate fine print.

The RE site needed to balance educating users with conversion points—directing them to purchase the faces (and their larger-sized accompaniments) from Font Bureau’s Webtype catalog. Stylistically, the site needed to align with Font Bureau’s brand, standing in harmony with a series of other typographic microsites the company had launched. Most of all, small type had to be the hero.

Reading Edge type scaler
With few assets other than the faces themselves, I jumped straight into sketching content ideas in the context of layout. Within our condensed timeline, we decided to keep the site constrained to a single page to feature controlled, art-directed outcomes and beautifully set type.
Reading Edge type scaler
A type scaler illustrated what to expect at different sizes depending on the rendering environment. I wrote new bios for each face to describe their characteristics.
Reading Edge type scaler
Edited by Nick Sherman, my feature essay dove into how screens render type, historical references, and features common to the faces’ construction. Typeset with RE typefaces, the essay also demonstrated the typographic control users could expect from the series.
To showcase the faces in a variety of potential moods and applications, I designed HTML specimens that paired each RE typeface with larger-set accompaniments from Font Bureau’s Webtype catalog.